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Everything You Tweet is Fair Game

I often remind executives that when they Tweet something, they are every time providing a quote for a reporter and need to take that into consideration that the contents of the tweet could show up again.

I was reminded of this myself in Sunday’s Sacramento Bee, in the Travel Column by Sam McManis when confronted with a Tweet I had sent nearly a month earlier while waiting for a plane:

THE TWEET

From Josh Morgan (@joshdmorg): “Dear all airport PA announcer script writers, can you stop saying ‘due to increased security.’ It’s been increased for 13 years now.”

— Compiled by Sam McManis, smcmanis@sacbee.com

 

 

 

 

Agency Lessons from Mad Men Episode 706 – “The Strategy”

Image from AMCTV.com/MadMen

Image from AMCTV.com/MadMen

 

Mad Men still includes real issues faced by advertising (and yes PR firms) in an incredible show. If I wasn’t in this industry, I’m sure I would still be a fan of the show, but for me I get a bonus. I get to watch situations I encounter all the time dealt with by others. Mad Men continues to include real issues faced by advertising (and yes PR firms) in an incredible show. Throughout the course of the series I’ve written 24 posts about real world agency lessons from the show and here’s a few from “The Strategy:”

  • Roger Sterling says “I’ve tried it and it sucked – don’t work drunk.” Trust me on this one.  While I wasn’t drunk, there was a moment early in my career when I responded to a client email after I’d had a few beers.  While the content of the email was right, my tone may have benefited from being tempered a bit had I not had those beers.  Take this piece of Sterling’s Gold and live it.
  • Native Advertising – Bob gives a gift of an Erector set to Joan’s son, and says, “America needs engineers.” – My cynical brain saw this as STEM messaging – native advertising.
  • How do you think? Peggy asks Don how he thinks and comes up with ideas, he responds with, “You really want to help me show you how you think? You can’t tell people what they want – it has to be what you want.”  The episode starts with Peggy doing research with onsite interviews. Never discount research, but she hits the idea when it’s what matters to her – “It’s about family, every table here is a family table.”

Agency Lessons from Mad Men Episode 704 “The Monolith”

dondraper, madmen

Image from AMCTV.com/MadMen

 

Mad Men still includes real issues faced by advertising (and yes PR firms) in an incredible show. If I wasn’t in this industry, I’m sure I would still be a fan of the show, but for me I get a bonus. I get to watch situations I encounter all the time dealt with by others. Mad Men continues to include real issues faced by advertising (and yes PR firms) in an incredible show. Throughout the course of the series I’ve written 24 posts about real world agency lessons from the show and here’s a few from “The Monolith:”

  • Don’t say things you don’t want people to hear:  Maybe Peggy did want Lou Avery, the anti-Don, to hear her derogatory comments.  Whether she did or not, he did.  She ended up with a raise, but also, Don on her team.  Lou is Machiavellian with this move. He has the chance to give Peggy what she wants, while possibly setting up both her and Don to fail.
  • Prospective customers are everywhere:  Don sees the possibility of LeaseTech, the company installing their new “monolith” as a prospective customer. Of course, he may blow the whole thing when he decides to re-fill his can of Coke with vodka.  Note to keep your eyes out for prospects, and the booze out of yourself while at work.

 

What’s the backstory – Muscle Shoals on PBS

Clarence Carter in “Muscle Shoals,” image from PBS.org

 

When I first started listening to Lynyrd Skynyrd in high school I quickly learned the words to many songs including “Sweet Home Alabama.”  There was a line in the song that I knew by heart but had no idea what it meant, “in Muscle Shoals they love the Swampers.”  I knew the song was about Alabama and at the time ESPN always showed swamp buggy racing, so I assumed that this lyric was about swamp buggies (check them out, trust me).

Four years ago, I stumbled onto a short documentary on Vice.com, “The Muscle Shoals Sound,” (which incidentally I believe was what they call “sponsored content” now from Levi’s) and I was introduced to Fame Studios and the amazing music created by world famous bands that all came to this small town in Alabama.

Tonight, I by chance turned on a new documentary on PBS Independent Lens about Muscle Shoals. Please go watch it, and next time you hear a lyric that catches you, track down what it means. Who knows maybe you’ll stumble onto some of the most amazing music you’ll ever find.

 

Also, they’ve created an amazing play list of songs from Muscle Shoals on Spotify. Check it out. Trust me.

 

 

Agency Lessons from Mad Men Episode 701 – “Time Zones”

Image from AMCTV.com/MadMen

Image from AMCTV.com/MadMen

Mad Men is entering its prolonged last season and continues to include real issues faced by advertising (and yes PR firms) in an incredible show. If I wasn’t in this industry, I’m sure I would still be a fan of the show, but for me I get a bonus. I get to watch situations I encounter all the time dealt with by others. Mad Men continues to include real issues faced by advertising (and yes PR firms) in an incredible show. Throughout the course of the series I’ve written 23 posts about real world agency lessons from the show and here’s a few from “Time Zones:”

  • “Advertising might be a more effective if it’s better integrated into our business” – moving things in house. Change for change sake. “I was hired to be bold and I am prepared to make my recommendation.” This is what Joan is told when she meets with a current client who wants to bring all of their advertising in house. Joan ends up turning this around with a Monday morning phone call when she presents the client with reasons why an agency can do things he can’t do in house just yet. This could have been avoided if Joan had been adequately prepped for the meeting (and even if prepped sometimes you still get blindsided).
  • After Joan’s initial meeting with the client, who has an MBA, she goes to a third party expert, in education, for ideas and validation. We do this all the time and if you’re not, you should be.
  • We have apparently identified the exact moment when people moved from the handshake to the “professional hug.” It’s in the office, heck it’s onstage when someone meets the president, but we can point to this beginning when Pete greets Don in the coffee shop and Don sticks out his hand and Pete gives him what Seinfeld’s Uncle Leo would call a “firm embrace.”

 

 

Could you write your own obituary? James Rebhorn did and it is beautiful.

You may not recognize the name, but you’ll recognize his face, and after reading this, we should all recognize his life.

His Life, According to Jim

 

James Robert Rebhorn was born on Sept. 1, 1948, in Philadelphia, PA. His mother, Ardell Frances Rebhorn, nee Hoch, loved him very much and supported all his dreams. She taught him the value of good manners and courtesy, and that hospitality is no small thing. His father, James Harry Rebhorn, was no less devoted to him. From him, Jim learned that there is no excuse for poor craftsmanship. A job well done rarely takes more or less time than a job poorly done. They gave him his faith and wisely encouraged him to stay in touch with God.

He is survived by his sister, Janice Barbara Galbraith, of Myrtle Beach, SC. She was his friend, his confidant, and, more often than either of them would like to admit, his bridge over troubled waters.

He is also survived by his wife, Rebecca Fulton Linn, and his two daughters, Emma Rebecca Rebhorn and Hannah Linn Rebhorn. They anchored his life and gave him the freedom to live it. Without them, always at the center of his being, his life would have been little more than a vapor. Rebecca loved him with all his flaws, and in her the concept of ceaseless love could find no better example.
His children made him immensely proud. Their dedication to improving our species and making the world a better place gave him hope for the future. They deal with grief differently, and they should each manage it as they see fit. He hopes, however, that they will grieve his passing only as long as necessary. They have much good work to do, and they should get busy doing it. Time is flying by. His son-in-law, Ben, also survives him. Jim loved Ben, who was as a son to Jim, especially through these last months.
His aunts Jean, Dorothy and Florence, numerous cousins and their families, and many devoted friends also survive Jim. He loved them all, and he knows they loved him.

Jim received his BA at Wittenberg University and his MFA at Columbia. He was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha Nu Zeta 624, a life-long Lutheran, and a longtime member of both the AMC and ACLU.

Jim was fortunate enough to earn his living doing what he loved. He was a professional actor. His unions were always there for him, and he will remain forever grateful for the benefits he gained as a result of the union struggle. Without his exceptional teachers and the representation of the best agents in the business, he wouldn’t have had much of a career. He was a lucky man in every way.
–Jim Rebhorn, March 2014

Three Pieces of Advice for Those About to Get Their First Job

PacificAlumni

Last month I wrote about helping students at Pacific find their story to prep for their first job interviews.  I was back this month as part of a panel of alumni hosted by the Pacific American Marketing Association and the Eberhardt School of Business on tips for helping students find that first job.

At the end of the panel we were asked if we had any last pieces of advice to share.  I had three:

  • Be professionally curious – Always keep learning. Especially at your first job. If someone gives you something to copy, read it. If you are searching articles for mentions of a client or competitor, read the articles, don’t just do keyword searches.
  • Find inspiration outside of work – I work in a semi-creative industry, where I’m writing a lot, and increasingly helping pair images and stories.  To stay inspired, I look outside of marketing and PR.  I love museums, have a pile of art books that I look at, and follow Instagram accounts that are inspiring visually.
  • Give back – I was at my alma mater, and to be honest for the first ten years after I graduated I didn’t contribute very much to the community.  Now, I try and help out students when I can by sharing my experiences, acting as a mentor and when possible pointing students in the direction of jobs.

What are your three pieces of advice for those just getting started?

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